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Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

1 edition of Assessment of winter injury to berry crops in Oregon, 1991 found in the catalog.

Assessment of winter injury to berry crops in Oregon, 1991

Assessment of winter injury to berry crops in Oregon, 1991

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Published by Agricultural Experiment Station, Oregon State University in [Corvallis, Or.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Berries -- Wounds and injuries -- Oregon.,
  • Berries -- Frost damage -- Oregon.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementNeil Bell ... [et al.]
    SeriesSpecial report / Agricultural Experiment Station, Oregon State University -- 902., Special report (Oregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 902.
    ContributionsBell, Neil 1961-, Oregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination23 p. :
    Number of Pages23
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16094265M

    Operated on the campus of Michigan State University, carries a variety of exclusive Spartan items. Proceeds from sales help benefit scholarships, programs, and .   In , winter wheat fields experiencing the most freeze injury were those low on soil water (under moisture stress) and which had poor stands and/or a poor canopy. It takes a number of warm days (a week or more depending on temperatures) after freezing to determine the condition of the winter wheat crop, so don’t make any quick decisions.

      Winter wheat development is behind normal in many areas of Nebraska. At the University of Nebraska–Lincoln West Central Research and Extension Center Dryland Farm south of North Platte, the average temperature since January 1, , was °F. This compares to an average temperature of 34°F. In , when winter wheat was as much as . Winter Injury of Landscape Plants in the Pacific Northwest; Established Plantings-Burndown and Directed Applications in or between Berry Rows without Soil Residual. acetic acid (Weed Pharm Weed and Grass Killer) Rate 15 to 30 gal product/a.

      Winter injury and winter kill can occur if crown temperatures go much below 0 degrees F, and when mid-winter warm spells cause the plants to break dormancy early and become more susceptible to late-winter cold crown temperatures. Freezing of ponded water in low-laying areas frequently causes localized spots of winterkill in fields. Kaiser, C., P. Skinkis, and M. Olmstead. Protecting Grapevines from Winter Injury. Oregon State University, Oregon State University Extension Service: Corvallis, Oregon. and Porter Lombard. Assessment of Winter Injury in Grapevines in Oregon. Oregon State University, Agricultural Experiment Station: Corvallis, Oregon.


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Assessment of winter injury to berry crops in Oregon, 1991 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Assessment of Winter Injury to Berry Crops in Oregon, Neil Belli, Esther Nelson, Bernadine Strik3, and Lloyd Martino Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University INTRODUCTION The Oregon small fruits industry supplies fresh berries for local consumption and is.

extent of the damage to adjust pruning and crop levels. Information on assessing winter injury and pruning accordingly was included in a "Winter Injury to Grapevines" report mailed to growers in January (Strik, ). Early and accurate assessment. Non Technical Summary Oregon's competitiveness in the national and world berry market will depend on maintaining high fruit quality and increasing consistency of yield and profitability per unit land area.

Production of trailing Assessment of winter injury to berry crops in Oregon has fluctuated through the years (as much as a 70% crop loss) due to winter injury.

Berry crops are intensively grown and have. Winter injury usually occurs during mid-winter when several warm days are followed by a cold snap. There is a range of cold hardiness between and within each type of bramble. Summer-bearing red raspberries are hardier than fall-bearing varieties and black berries are least hardy.

Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), inthe value of berry production in NYS was $15, for the three major berry crops (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries). In the last ten years, blueberry acreage has increased 29%, raspberries 11%, and strawberry acreage has declined slightly.

In those same ten years, theFile Size: 2MB. Flowering and fruiting on command in berry crops Article (PDF Available) in Acta horticulturae () January with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Time of seeding. September is the usually the best time to establish winter cover crops in a bare field in Western Oregon.

If seeded too soon (July or August) winter annual cover crops may either go to seed before they can easily be tilled under in the spring, or. Blueberries, although more cold hardy than other cane crops, could have been hit by the extreme cold temperatures this year. As spring nears and temperatures start to climb, Gary Gao, Extension specialist and associate professor of small fruits with The Ohio State University, suggests growers get out in the field and see what damage their blueberry canes suffered over.

Therefore an accurate assessment of injury is needed to make intelligent decisions pertaining to orchard management, anticipated labor requirements, and fruit marketing. I know from personal experience that it is difficult to accurately assess peach bud mortality during the winter after a cold event and even in the spring after a frost during.

Limited assessment of vinifera indicates substantial bud injury, approaching % dead primary buds in some varieties and locations. There is a lot of information available about bud damage from Extension programs in many states, but assessing the damage in your own vineyards is the best way to determine how to proceed in terms of your own.

Knowing the symptoms of freeze injury enables early assessment of the extent of injury. This gives more choices on ways to use the damaged crop and on alternate crops to plant. Waiting until harvest to learn that wheat has been damaged by freezing decreases the value of the damaged crop for some uses and limits management choices.

Avoid high nitrogen during fall/winter. Allow plants to acclimatize prior to cold weather. Protect plants from desiccation and extreme cold (Author: Rocco Schiavone. The winter of /14 was cold and abnormally dry across north-central and western Iowa. Dry soil conditions coupled with a lack of snow cover and an extended period of sub-freezing temperatures were ripe conditions for root and crown injury in fruit crops, including strawberry, raspberry, and blackberry.

It is important to remember that an alfalfa stand evaluation and winter injury assessment needs to be done by performing two main things: (1) stand counts; and (2) check the root system.

Stand Counts To determine if there will be a need for rotation, evaluate new shoots in plant stands on one square foot every 5 acres (other recommendations. More information: Winter Injury – Michigan State University Extension; Fertilizing winter-injured blueberries – Michigan State University Extension; Disease management considerations for winter-injured blueberries – Michigan State University Extension; See Solutions for additional diagnostic help or to start taking action.

The root systems of perennial plants are much less cold tolerant that the above ground portions of the plants. For the most species we can grow in Iowa, root injury can begin occur when the soil temperature drops below 18 to 15 degrees F.

Fortunately, the soil has a tremendous buffering capacity and the temperature in the root zone seldom drops this low, but.

The Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station of Missouri State University: Byers, Patrick: 13(5)9/ Vineyard Establishment Workshop Set for December 4: Editor: 6: 13(5)9/ Oak from Forest to Glass: Dharmadhikari, Murli: 7: 13(5)9/ Eau de Vie at Midwest Grape and Wine Conference: Rupf, Jorg: Author: Tracy Stout.

Strawberries: Winter injury. Cold temperature injury causes these symptoms. Slice the crown in half lengthwise and look for brown tissue. Healthy crowns are milky white inside. Berries website The Berry Diagnostic Tool was developed by: Marvin Pritts, Professor, Horticulture Section School of Integrative Plant Science.

in winter injury during years when damage was severe. Peart et al. () assessed winter injury on Mount Moosilauke, New Hampshire, in and found that injury increased with elevation and that sapling injury was greater on a west- em slope than on an eastern slope (no north or south slope assessment was included).Cited by:   Cold injury to fruit trees a big concern The need for growers to understand the impact of cold injury to fruit trees inparticularly to the more tender crops, made a series of presentations by Jon Clements, Extension tree fruit specialist with the University of Massachusetts, take on an urgent tone.

Winter wheat's behind-normal growth stage may have helped it escape major injury due to low temperatures this week. According to the USDA NASS May 11 Crop Progress report, 56% of the wheat was jointed, compared to the five-year average of This compares to the major injury that occurred in western Nebraska Mayand in late May E, Winter Injury to Grapevines and Methods of Protection, pages, $ This and many other publications on grape produc- tion and related topics are available through the.Winter injury to landscape plants often happens when sudden, unseasonably cold weather occurs in the fall.

Many plants are still growing in the fall and have not hardened off for the coming winter. The hardening process takes place naturally as gradually colder weather invades during the fall.